For current and future housing providers

For emergency housing, visit Emergency programs

For rental options, visit HousingLink

For openings in supportive housing units, visit the Hennepin Housing Key

Housing providers create and support homes for people in need. They may also provide special services.

Housing that allows people to live as independently as possible has the best chance of getting the county’s financial and other support. This means people have their own lease and key to the unit, and services that can include meals, help with medication, and help avoiding eviction. Independent living allows people to belong to the community where they live.

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Financing for new housing

State financing

You can apply for state tax credits, loans and grants.

Visit the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency 

Hennepin County can consult with you on state financing. Contact county housing staff at housing@hennepin.us

County financing

Providers must go through the county’s request for proposal (RFP) process. The county advertises these opportunities and providers respond to those requests. The county evaluates the responses and chooses providers based on the evaluations.

The county develops affordable housing through three programs:

Stay up to date on housing opportunities

Housing for people with disabilities

Housing with services for people with disabilities

Some people need services in their home to live independently. We call housing with services supportive housing.

As a provider you might deliver supportive housing in a group or individual setting. In group settings people may have to follow resident requirements, may share meals in a commercial kitchen and may have to follow house rules. In individual settings people have their own lease, control access to their living space, cook their own meals, and follow the rules of a typical lease.

Information sessions

Before submitting a housing proposal to the county:

  • We encourage you to attend information sessions held by both Hennepin County and the State of Minnesota
  • You’ll become a more fully informed Housing Support provider. You’ll learn about both county and state requirements.

Hennepin County information sessions

Learn how to become a Housing Support provider in Hennepin County.

State of Minnesota information sessions

You can attend sessions that cover:

  • Housing Support and how it’s used
  • Requirements of a Housing Support provider
  • How to become a Housing Support provider

For more information on State of Minnesota sessions, contact Jeremy Galley at jeremy.galley@state.mn.us.

How people pay you for rent and services

They can pay rent with:

  • Wages or earned income
  • Government benefits (like Social Security disability or Minnesota Supplemental Aid)
  • State or federal housing subsidies
  • State Housing Support (formerly called Group Residential Housing or GRH)

Whenever possible, the county wants you to provide a type of housing that allows people to pay their housing costs themselves. One key way for people with disabilities to pay for their housing costs is using their Supplemental Security Income together with Minnesota Supplemental Aid (MSA) Housing Assistance. Minnesota Supplemental Aid (MSA) Housing Assistance eligibility is expanding and benefit amount is increasing in 2020.

They can pay for services with:

  • Health insurance (for example, waiver services)
  • State and federal grant funds
  • State Housing Support

Group settings

In addition to state and county requirements for operating group settings, local city rules may also apply.

Adult foster care

Learn about adult foster care

Board and lodge

The county is not funding new board and lodge housing at this time.

These settings are licensed. They provide people a room (usually shared) and three meals a day to adults and sometimes families. The settings could provide either short-term or long-term housing. Some settings require tenants to take skills training or take part in religious activities.

Any given setting might serve people with specific needs, such as those with mental illness, a substance abuse problem, or who belong to just one gender. Or settings might serve a mix of people who need and want a certain level of care.

Individual settings

These provide the highest level of independent living.

Customized living

Customized living provides people with long-term housing and includes a lease, a private space (room or apartment), three meals per day and 24-hour supervision. Customized Living providers hold a Comprehensive Home Care license through the Minnesota Department of Health and are registered as Housing with Services Establishments.

Services are usually paid for with Medicaid Waivers such as Elderly Waiver, Community Access for Disability Inclusion (CADI), or Brain Injury (BI).

Providers must meet state and federal requirements, and must have a Comprehensive Home Care license. Before considering this option, review some of the requirements:

Housing Support demonstration program

The county is not developing new Housing Support demonstration programs at this time.

The Housing Support (formerly called Group Residential Housing or GRH) demonstration program provides long-term housing where people can prepare their own food, have their own private space and a lease. Housing Support funding pays for supportive services in this housing.

People who live in this housing – either a single adult, or an adult within a family with children – must meet two criteria:

  1. Have either a mental illness, substance abuse problem, HIV or AIDS.
  2. Be living on the streets, in a shelter or released from a regional treatment center, community hospital, or residential treatment program, have no access to appropriate housing and can’t get into appropriate housing.

Housing with services for independent living

This program serves people who can live independently, who are income-eligible and have disabilities. People must have a typical lease, be able to prepare their own meals and choose their own unit. Housing is in the private market and rent may be paid through the Housing Support program. People come from group housing, shelters, or other settings who would otherwise not have an option for independent housing.

Housing Support funding does not cover the supportive services you provide. Services are usually paid for with mainstream services such as Medicaid, Medicaid Waivers, etc. 

Long-term Homeless Supportive Housing

This program helps people get into and stay in their own apartment or rental home long term. The program serves people with disabilities who’ve been homeless a long time. Funding follows individuals, who get to choose a unit where they can prepare their own food, have their own private space and a typical lease.

Housing Support funding pays for both housing costs and supportive services.

Providers must follow national best practices called fidelity standards (PDF)

View more information about long-term homeless housing support (DOCX)

Getting Housing Support funding for people with disabilities

To get funding for Housing Support you must provide housing and services in line with a county program.

Housing Support pays for room and board for seniors and adults with disabilities, who have low income. The funding can pay for rent, utilities, household needs, and in some cases food, or supportive services.

You get paid based on state and federal minimums for what people need to live in the community.

Providers who contract with the State of Minnesota don’t automatically become providers with Hennepin County. To become a provider with the county, you must have a Housing Support agreement with the county and a vendor number.

The county chooses providers through the request for proposal (RFP) process and negotiates agreements with providers.

Stay up to date on housing opportunities

Housing to prevent and end homelessness

Housing programs

Providers can take part in various programs to prevent and end people’s homelessness, by helping them get into and stay in stable homes.

Providers can offer either temporary or permanent assistance.

Programs serve people experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness, including people with disabilities.

Homeless prevention

Providers offer services that prevent homelessness among single adults, families, and youth. Services focus on households at immediate risk of becoming homeless. Programs provide financial assistance, short-term services to address the immediate housing crisis, and connections to other mainstream services to support more long term needs.

Providers must go through the county’s request for proposal (RFP) process. The county advertises these opportunities and providers respond to those requests. The county evaluates the responses and chooses providers based on the evaluations.

You receive funding from state and federal money:

  • State Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance grant
  • Federal community development block grants
  • Other state and federal funds

Rapid rehousing to end homelessness

Providers help single adults, families, and youth quickly exit homelessness and return to permanent housing. Programs help identify appropriate housing options, and provide rental assistance and case management.

Providers must go through the county’s request for proposal (RFP) process. The county advertises these opportunities and providers respond to those requests. The county evaluates the responses and chooses providers based on the evaluations.

You receive funding from state and federal money:

  • State Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance grant
  • Federal Emergency Solutions Grants
  • Federal community development block grants
  • Federal McKinney-Vento grants
  • Other state and federal funds

Transitional housing

No new funding for transitional housing is available at this time.

In transitional housing, providers house people who are homeless (single adults, families, and youth) for up to 24 months. They also provide support services to help people move to and stay in housing.

Current providers receive federal grants, and state and county contracts.

Permanent supportive housing

Providers help single adults, families, and youth find their own home or apartment, then support them in staying in their home. Providers help people pay their rent, take care of their personal needs, manage their cases and work with their landlord. This program helps people who’ve been homeless several times or homeless for over a year.

Providers must go through the county’s request for proposal (RFP) process. The county advertises these opportunities and providers respond to those requests. The county evaluates the responses and chooses providers based on the evaluations.

You receive funding from state and federal money:

  • State Housing Support (see above)
  • Federal McKinney-Vento grants
  • Long-Term Homeless Supportive Services Funds
  • Tenant-based subsidies, property tax funds, philanthropic support, and individual grants

Getting funding to prevent and end homelessness

All housing programs in Hennepin County are developed through the request for proposal process.

Stay up to date on housing opportunities

For current providers

Update your vacancy information

Hennepin Housing Key

Agreement renewal process

You sign a housing support agreement every year. The agreement changes along with changes in state law or best practices.

Long Term Housing Support Providers must follow national best practices called fidelity standards (PDF)

For questions email hs.housing.grh@hennepin.us.

Resources for homeless prevention and rapid rehousing providers

Manuals and provider summaries  

Providers are also encouraged to attend work groups and advisory committee meetings.

Continuum of Care funding and support

Providers can get technical assistance, evaluation and ranking, and prepare for the annual federal funding process. You work with the funding committee for HUD McKinney-Vento Continuum of Care program.

Continuum of Care resources

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